Kari Moore, RN
2005 National Winner (RN Category)
RN
Holy Family Hospital, Spokane, WA
 
 
 
“ I am inspired to give my best because people rely on it, especially when it comes to their wife, daughter, sister, mother, or child. As a nurse, I feel that our profession serves the community, and we should always strive for 100 percent satisfaction. In my work setting, that means fulfilling needs that are clinical, emotional and physical.”
Kari Moore, RN
 
SPOKANE NURSE KARI MOORE WINS CHEROKEE INSPIRED COMFORT AWARD

As a registered nurse who cares for mothers and babies during the life-changing experience of childbirth, Kari Moore witnesses some of life’s greatest joys and deepest sorrows. As a nurse, Moore believes her role involves  being a caregiver, protector and comforter in every situation.

In recognition of her exceptional service and compassion, Moore has received the prestigious Cherokee Inspired Comfort Award, one of only 14 people honored nationwide in 2005. The award is granted annually by Cherokee Uniforms – a leading designer and manufacturer of healthcare apparel – to recognize nurses and other non-physician healthcare professionals who demonstrate exceptional service, sacrifice and innovation and have a positive impact on others’ lives.

“Kari Moore has provided loving care and invaluable support to families in her community,” said Wendell Mobley, who directs the national award for Cherokee. “She also has made her colleagues and her hospital very proud to call her their own. Kari is a shining example of service and empathy.”

As a National Winner in the award’s Registered Nurse category, Moore receives an all-expense-paid trip to a 2006 U.S. medical conference of her choice, an annual membership to a clinical organization, a wardrobe featuring the best of Cherokee Uniforms and Rockers Footwear worth more than $1,000, a 2005 Cherokee Inspired Comfort Award trophy and placement in Cherokee’s 2006 Inspired Comfort Award calendar.

Brenda Bauman, an RN colleague in the unit, nominated Moore for the Cherokee Inspired Comfort Award. “I have seen Kari connect with hundreds of women and their families during one of the most important times in their lives,” said Bauman. “I think Kari is an excellent representation of what an exceptional nurse is about.” They became friends in nursing school at Spokane Community College, when Moore was balancing being a full-time student while also caring for her three young children and husband.

For nearly five years, Moore has worked in the labor and delivery unit at Holy Family Hospital in Spokane – a position she loves, and the kind of work that even in high school she dreamed of doing. If a problem is suspected during a birth, Moore, who has special training in at-risk neonates, will be called on to help. “Every day is different, and we have to react quickly to situations and be on our toes at all times,” Moore explained, “No matter what happens, I have to stay calm on the inside. During a crisis, you have to reassure yourself that you do know the basics and know what you have to do. It helps that there’s so much trust among the nurses and physicians.”

On average, 90 babies are born in the unit each month, and she has been known to extend her shift into the evening to see a patient’s labor through to the magical moment. “When a couple asks if they can take a picture of me with their new baby, I am honored and always happy to do it. I am inspired to give my best day in and day out, because people rely on my best,” Moore remarked. “I feel our profession is a service to the community, and we should always strive for 100 percent satisfaction. Satisfaction in this setting is being aware of and fulfilling the needs of the patients and their families, which are both physical and emotional.”

Although the labor and delivery unit is thought of as a “happy place,” it has its share of crises and sad stories. Bauman recalled Moore’s compassion and service toward  a young couple whose first child was delivered stillborn. “The family was here from out of town for the patient’s baby shower when she started having contractions, came to our hospital and discovered her baby had died,” Bauman said. “She had high school and college friends lined up to celebrate her shower with her; instead, she was in labor, knowing her delivery would be a silent one.” Kari spent private time comforting the woman and her husband – praying with them, acknowledging their feelings of loss, and helping to put things in order for them.

Since the Cherokee Inspired Comfort Award was established in 2003, more than 3,400healthcare professionals have been nominated in the Registered Nurse, Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurse, Student Nurse and Non-Physician Healthcare Professional categories. A panel of nursing professionals and Cherokee representatives evaluates each nomination and grants the awards.

For every nomination in 2005, Cherokee Uniforms donated $1 to Nurses House, a national fund that provides short-term financial assistance to registered nurses facing serious hardship. Cherokee donated $1,300 in Nurses House in 2005.
 
Nominated by: Brenda Bauman (RN-C at the Holy Family Hospital, Spokane, WA)  
I remember in nursing school we were told to be empathetic not sympathetic. Where does one draw that line? I have known Kari Moore for 7 years, 5 of those years as a RN. Kari signifies what a nurse should be. I work with Kari on the Labor and Delivery floor of a mid-sized hospital. During this time, I have seen Kari connect with hundreds of women and their families during one of the most important times in their lives. Many people think of L&D as the "happy place" in the hospital. It is so much more than that.
Kari is one of the nurses that does not just shuffle patients through. She meets women where THEY are. I remember one night shift that we arrived and on the board Kari was assigned a fetal demise. This is always a difficult assignment. Kari cared for her patient’s physical needs; that is helping with pain control, monitoring bleeding, vital signs, but even more important was the true and honest caring, and yes, empathy she showed this young family.
The family was here from out of town for the patient’s baby shower when she started having contractions, came to our hospital and discovered her baby had died. She had high school and college friends here lined up to celebrate her shower with her; instead, she was in labor...knowing her delivery would be a silent one. Kari turned lights down low, wiped her patients sweaty brow and wiped away tears. The woman was not her only patient that night. The father, who felt at loss to help his wife, needed Kari also. Kari took his hand and over his wife, they prayed for the lost birthday parties, lost scraped knees that would never be healed with a kiss, and for lost hopes and dreams. Kari cried with this young family. The baby delivered that night. Kari quickly wrapped the baby in a warm blanket, placed a little hat on his head and placed him in his mother’s arms. The family connected with that baby, and then felt ready to let go. Kari gently took the baby to our back room and through her tears, gently weighed, measured and took footprints, a picture and a lock of his hair for his parents. It is such a hard emotional time when someone loses a baby, but I know that that young family took comfort in knowing how tenderly their baby was being treated.

I think Kari is an excellent representation of what an exceptional nurse is about. She has had special training in at-risk neonates, she is competent, and is so fun and well liked by her peers. Please consider her for your award; you will not be disappointed. If you meet her, your life will be fuller.

 
Holy Family News - Holy Family Nurse Receives National Recognition